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A reading people

As I head to the Susanna Wesley Foundation office in Southlands College each week, I pass a large sign which reads: A reading people will always be a knowing people. It is a quote from John Wesley, a man often caricatured as a ‘man of one book’ when in fact he read and wrote many. It is no surprise that the Foundry, where he established the first Methodist headquarters, had a Book Room and that education was a central part of the Methodist revival. Since Wesley, it is fair to say that British and Irish Methodism have had a complex relationship with learning. How many of us have heard that the longest journey in the world is the one between the head and the heart? For too many Methodists, the

Susanna's Wise Words

20th January 2019 is the 350th anniversary of the birth of Susanna Wesley. Here are some prayers you might want to use in worship: A prayer based on her devotional journal: O God, Holy and Infinite, may your Presence direct our actions, and your Wisdom, our thoughts; As we meditate on the Power of your Goodness and the Truth of your Justice, work within us to transform our minds and guard our hearts. Amen. [ORIGINAL: Help me to live and act as if in your Presence: To think often of your omnipotence and omniscience; Of your power, wisdom, goodness, justice, truth, And above all, your infinite Purity; Which will be a check upon my mind, And be the best preservative against all temptations.] Su

Can we fix it?

Are you a fixer or a changer? I have already shared in previous posts about the current situation my partner and I save with regard to finding more appointments in the Methodist Church. I have not shared everything because we live under a discipline that prevents full disclosure and because the system is set up in a way that means we are not privy to what goes on in the room where the crucial decisions are taken. As we have gone through each ‘round’ of matching people and places, and come away empty-handed, quite a number of our Methodist friends have shared their disbelief and distress about the way we have been treated. It is striking how many, witnessing our disappointment or frustration,

B Day

It has been 935 days since voting closed in the Brexit referendum. Since then we have been bombarded with speculation, hyperbole, insinuation and even occasionally information about the future of the UK after 29 March 2019. With only 72 days left, are any of us any clearer on what might lie ahead? After all the hype, is this really the week that decides the fate of the UK for generations to come? Andrew Marr, in his book, My Trade, offered some advice on reading a newspaper. He suggested that any headline ending in a question mark should be treated with extreme caution and if the answer to the question could quite reasonably be ‘no’, then it was probably best to skip the rest of the article.

Can we fix it?

Are you a fixer or a changer? I have already shared in previous posts about the current situation my partner and I share with regard to finding more appointments in the Methodist Church. I have not shared everything because we live under a discipline that prevents full disclosure and because the system is set up in a way that means we are not privy to what goes on in the room where the crucial decisions are taken. As we have gone through each ‘round’ of matching people and places, and come away empty-handed, quite a number of our Methodist friends have shared their disbelief and distress about the way we have been treated. It is striking how many, witnessing our disappointment or frustration

B DAY!

It has been 935 days since voting closed in the Brexit referendum. Since then we have been bombarded with speculation, hyperbole, insinuation and even occasionally information about the future of the UK after 29 March 2019. With only 72 days left, are any of us any clearer on what might lie ahead? After all the hype, is this really the week that decides the fate of the UK for generations to come? Andrew Marr, in his book, My Trade, offered some advice on reading a newspaper. He suggested that any headline ending in a question mark should be treated with extreme caution and if the answer to the question could quite reasonably be ‘no’, then it was probably best to skip the rest of the article.

Flat Pack Vocation?

The last few months have been hard work and for those friends who have offered support, love, thoughts and prayers, both of us are profoundly grateful. Naively, as it turns out, by now we thought that we would both know where we would be living and working after the summer. We didn’t expected to be where we are and having to contemplate the range of scenarios that now lie before us. Whilst the experience has been unsettling, lonely, frustrating and painful (something I have written about in an earlier post) it has forced me to consider once again the nature of vocation and discernment. Since leaving the Queen’s Foundation in 2017, I have been working at the Susanna Wesley Foundation and in t

A House Divided?

‘A house divided against itself cannot stand.’ Despite the Biblical quote, this is actually a blogpost about the state of politics in Britain and elsewhere. For many decades, with rare exceptions, most of us have experienced a form of democracy dominated by two major political blocs - Left and Right, conservative and progressive, Christian Democrats and Social Democrats. Each bloc presented its ideological view of the good society and, in general, each were given an opportunity to implement policies based on that view. Despite sometimes seismic changes in policy direction between governments of differents hues, this was looked upon as political stability, mainly because most of those governm

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